Paris Restaurants

387 restaurants in Paris





Restaurants in Paris:

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Selected Restaurant
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Rue Mazarine 62, Paris, 75006 [Map]

When Sir Terence Conran opened this impressive three hundred seater restaurant, he promised to reinvent the Parisian brasserie, and he's clearly succeeded. He chose the heart of Paris's chic Odeon district as the spot for his first cross channel venture. Learn more

When Sir Terence Conran opened this impressive three hundred seater restaurant, he promised to reinvent the Parisian brasserie, and he's clearly succeeded. He chose the heart of Paris's chic Odeon district as the spot for his first cross channel venture.

Varied, sophisticated cuisine with an emphasis on French food and fish is served in the vast, sumptuously decorated room on the lower level. Upstairs there's an ultra trendy bar and lounge, where an international line-up of DJs work their magic on the turntables making it feel more like London. A small, exclusive private room is available for hire.

The location itself is steeped in history. It was the royal tennis court in the 17th century, a printing house in the 18th century and later the orchestral cabaret of Jean-Marie Rivière until 1990. This wonderful site in the heart of Saint-Germain des Prés was also a famous transvestite cabaret bar before taking on its current form in 1998.

The glass roof dominates the ground floor, with the kitchen behind a picture window where you can see Chef Guillaume Lutard and his team preparing the meals. On the first floor, in the mezzanine, is the bar and private room where you can dine in an elegant and festive lounge atmosphere while listening to the latest trend-setting music.

The chef, who used to be at Taillevent, offers a range of fun fare, from seafood, to classic French Mediterranean, or English inspired dishes that suit a relaxed gourmet clientele. Lest you forget this is Conran land, there are also very good fish and chips and Irish coffee. Customers who come in for Sunday brunch can treat themselves to a ten minute Shiatsu massage at a chair set up in the dining room.

Starters range from dish of shellfish, fresh green beans salad, spinach, poached egg, sauce vierge with sesame seeds to salmon tataki with ginger. Main courses listed may include homemade rabbit terrine with pistachio nuts, pan sautéed gilt-headed bream, spring vegetables and spicy quinoa, egg plant with caraway and fennel.

The pudding inventory is headed by dishes like Saint Marcellin cheese, three pots of cream lightly flavoured with vanilla, chocolate and coffee and peach poached in lemon verbena, peach sorbet and for the sweeter tooth there's gooey chocolate cake.

French, International

€35.00€49.00

Selected Restaurant

6, rue Arsène Houssaye, Paris, 75008 [Map]

Chef and owner Gilles Epié named Citrus Etoile in honour of his friend Michel Richard and his Los Angeles restaurant, Citrus. Gilles's food is remarkable and this is evident from the fact that he still holds the record of being the youngest recipient of the coveted Michelin star at age twenty-two. Learn more

Chef and owner Gilles Epié named Citrus Etoile in honour of his friend Michel Richard and his Los Angeles restaurant, Citrus. Gilles's food is remarkable and this is evident from the fact that he still holds the record of being the youngest recipient of the coveted Michelin star at age twenty-two.

After earning plaudits at their previous successful ventures, L'Orangerie and Chez Gilles in Beverly Hills, the husband and wife team decided to continue their gastronomic journey back in France. They believe that the best produce to satisfy the most demanding clients in the world is available in Paris, and an enormous cépe cooked and served whole epitomizes this proposition. 

The orange and white hued dining area is light and airy with a goldfish bowl on every table. Elizabeth Epié deserves the accolades she is accorded for designing a restaurant with a bright feel, which caters to celebrities, politicians and commoners.

At Citrus Etoile, Gilles remains faithful to his philosophy of flavoursome and light cooking but one that is strong on tradition. So whether it's asparagus with salmon caviar, braised scallops with Parmesan cheese and olive oil, or John Dory served with its skin on a bed of laurel leaves, the kitchen has the talent to turn out simple things with great flair. The subtle use of butter and cream helps you leave on a light note

Start with a creamy burrata cheese and tartare of tomato basil, zucchini soup with croquettes or the ravioli of foie gras topped with truffle foam, which has a mysterious egg yolk within. This could be followed by grilled snapper cooked in an oriental style with Brittany crispy sausage and mashed potatoes, and Provençal beef stew cooked with black olives and grilled polenta.

Their speciality dishes of foie gras stuffed beignets topped with a syrupy sweet port wine reduction or the classic rabbit, served with mustard sauce and figs, are delicate yet addictive. Desserts include raspberries with mascarpone, a cheese plate accompanied by a green salad or the Californian classic of coconut ice cream donut, a reminder of Gilles's stint in Los Angeles.

Those who find it hard to choose can just pop a question to Madame Epié and she will be happy to recommend a dish, maybe something that is light and hearty yet retains its myriad flavours. A glass of Cognac or Santenay Rouge could bring the blissful Citrus Etoile experience to an end.

French

N/AN/A

Selected Restaurant

70 Boulevard de Menilmontant, Paris, 75020 [Map]

Step into the medieval Troubadours in Boulevard de Ménilmontant and you'll be forgiven for feeling that you've entered a time warp. The place is full of charm and authenticity where culinary finesse marries cultural wealth. Learn more

Step into the medieval Troubadours in Boulevard de Ménilmontant and you'll be forgiven for feeling that you've entered a time warp. The place is full of charm and authenticity where culinary finesse marries cultural wealth. The books, paintings and scrolls on display trigger curiosity and diners feel they are being transported to a different realm altogether.

The dining area is rich in antiquity and illustrates the different cultures of the world while the nostalgic décor plunges into the heart of the centuries that have marked the history of civilization. The stone walls, mirrors, couches and piano replicate the picture of a medieval home. Talented musicians sit under a small canopy and it appears that they are tuning up before a feast. The terrace area is for those who would like to soak up the sun while sipping a cup of tea in the evening.

In the kitchen, Chef Patrick is on a mission to restore forgotten flavours and revive the intricacies in fresh and authentic ingredients. Gleaning his recipes from ancient poetry, he discloses that many of them are a blend of the classic with a modern touch. Everything is chosen with precision and he is delighted to explain the dishes. Every guest receives a personalized welcome from the man himself and he would be happy to recommend some delicacies as well.

The menu, with its ornamental motifs and detailed descriptions, make an interesting read. The soupe a l'ancienne au poulet fermier includes chives from Thailand, which were painstakingly unearthed by Patrick. Meats are marinated for forty-eight hours, and pies and bread are all made in-house. Their specialty dishes include chicken T'Kanawa, confit of lamb with fresh spinach and 'jumped the gumbos' veal dish while scallops served on subtly flavoured rice and fish soup with barley, lemon and capers are amongst other delights.

Troubadours were composers and performers of Occitan lyric poetry during the high middle ages. The texts of their songs dealt mainly with themes of chivalry and courtly love. Star singers Aviva Timonier, Susan Miller and Elisa Doughty keep up the Troubadour spirit with their feisty sopranos from Strauss, Mozart, Puccini, Vivaldi and Rossini operas between courses. They frequently organise cultural events such as lyrical concerts and reading of poetry in seven languages. This restaurant appeals to all senses and is a unique meeting place for culinary art, love of music and a visual treat.

French

N/AN/A

Selected Restaurant

6 rue du Débarcadère, Paris, 75017 [Map]

Paolo Petrini is the owner and chef of this chic Paris restaurant that proudly bears his name. He counts music and food among his greatest passions, and few things are more rewarding than an occupation, which is both exciting and satisfying. Learn more

Paolo Petrini is the owner and chef of this chic Paris restaurant that proudly bears his name. He counts music and food among his greatest passions, and few things are more rewarding than an occupation, which is both exciting and satisfying. Paolo introduces Parisians to Italian culinary wonders that have taken two generations of his family to perfect.

The recently renovated spaces of his restaurant are as warm and welcoming as they were more than twenty years back. Light beige stucco with flashes of bright colour, attractive black leather chairs and fresh flowers welcome customers to the happy refuge, a minute's walk from Paris's Porte Maillot.

More than two decades of dedication have earned him an excellent reputation and recognition in the area of turning out great tasting and authentic, regional Tuscan cuisine. Paolo makes sure he uses only the best ingredients to create his popular dishes. Talent shines through in the simple yet flavoursome dishes such as aubergine gratin topped with basil and mozzarella.

You could start with confit of pork or a simple beef carpaccio, rocket and parmesan salad. The main courses yield ample evidence of the skills of the kitchen brigade; being Italian, Paolo Petrini serves wonderful pasta with choices such as ravioli stuffed with courgettes, ricotta, butter and sage, spaghetti with tomatoes and Sicilian dates, and taglierini and melted cheese fondue of the Aoste Valley.

Italian cooking has a way with fish, and there are dishes such as pave of swordfish with grilled ratatouille caponata or linguine with clams, to prove this point. Tender sirloin, which comes with potatoes, grilled girolles and balsamic sauce, says it for the carnivores.

Tiramisu with strawberries, pannacotta, fruit and red Marasquin jostle with profiteroles and a selection of fine Italian cheeses on the dessert menu. A list of regional Italian wines makes the whole experience of being there complete.

Even though Paolo runs the restaurant and the focus is naturally always on food, music is not forgotten. He is a trained singer who loves the bel canto style and holds regular concerts for visitors to enjoy.

Italian

N/A€46.00

Selected Restaurant
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164 Boulevard de Grenelle, Paris, 75015 [Map]

The Corsican cuisine is as rugged as its history and greatly influenced by the island's many aggressors - the Romans, who used it as a base for their conquest of Gaul, the Spanish and the Genoese - a fact that has gastronomic enthusiasts in mainland France hunger after their fare. Learn more

The Corsican cuisine is as rugged as its history and greatly influenced by the island's many aggressors - the Romans, who used it as a base for their conquest of Gaul, the Spanish and the Genoese - a fact that has gastronomic enthusiasts in mainland France hunger after their fare.

Hand picked local produce, helping to create the authentic and generous cuisine of this beautiful island, includes specialities like chestnuts; cured meat, which comes from pigs that are bred in the mountains and fed on wild provisions giving the meat an earthy, delicious taste, and cheese, which includes goats' cheese and brocciu, made from ewe's milk and considered the national dish.

Bringing these simple ingredients to life is the La Villa Corsa Rive Gauche, a splendid restaurant where even if the ambience is non-Corsican, every bit of the fare is. It has become an embassy of that striking isle for gourmets as it is serving authentic food in a refined and cosy atmosphere. 

The three sections, a library, the mezzanine and lounge are luxurious and decorated with wooden panels, a false-fireplace, paintings and chandeliers made of Murano glass. Odd elements like plastered pseudo-rustic benches and hardwood also pepper the interior. In the kitchen, Chef Henri Boutier enchants customers with his knowledge of dishes.

Roasted duck breast, pears in red wine spicy, juice/honey sauce niolu could be the main draw for some while the wild sounding wolf Corsica roast on the skin, pallets of pulenda - a kind of polenta made with chestnut flour - and olive oil with herbs might attract the crowd looking for a taste of Corsica. Those looking for something simpler may consider stufatu, a dish prepared with mushrooms, macaroni and onions.

Of course before you move into these dishes there are delicious starters like duck foie gras marinated in Muscat cape, compotée figs, ravioli of ceps and chestnuts, cream truffles and supions - a variety of cuttlefish - cooked with olive oil, cherry tomatoes and fresh herbs.

Soft warm chestnuts, chestnuts fondant, chestnut ice or a fiadone paisanu lemon - an Easter tart - for a dessert will leave you with a lingering flavour of the region. There's also the cappuccino corsinu in case you have any space left in your stomach.

All this could be the typical fare for fixed menu, for the day's specialities and surprises you will have to look at the slate board and decide.

French

N/A€47.00

Selected Restaurant
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16 rue Feydeau, Paris, 75002 [Map]

A few steps away from Place de la Bourse in the second arrondissement of Paris, the warm and elegant Le Versance has been wonderfully renewed to its former glory. The upstairs restaurant with its dove grey décor is enlivened with nineteenth century mouldings, stunning stained glass windows and a menu etched on a glass partition featuring courses served at the opening of the Elysee Palace. Learn more

A few steps away from Place de la Bourse in the second arrondissement of Paris, the warm and elegant Le Versance has been wonderfully renewed to its former glory. The upstairs restaurant with its dove grey décor is enlivened with nineteenth century mouldings, stunning stained glass windows and a menu etched on a glass partition featuring courses served at the opening of the Elysee Palace. While sipping an apéritif at the plush lounge area downstairs, diners can prepare themselves to savour innovative French delights.

Chef Samuel Cavagnis, who is an avid globe trotter and voyager, interspersed cooking and adventure before fulfilling his childhood dream to be a chef and open his restaurant. This Georges Blanc protégé does not attempt to include the aromas of the world in his cooking; he prefers to draw inspiration from his own personality, influenced by the desire to share and travel. The menu showcases the depth of his repertoire and may occasionally revolve around certain spices or herbs; these aromatic plants are even found on the tables in miniature pots!

Pasta shells stuffed with salmon rillettes flavoured with dill and pink peppercorns, and île flottante, a meringue in liquorice-spiked custard sauce with pink almond praline shows the fact that the kitchen dares to look beyond the mundane.

Starters of grilled foie gras with artichoke emulsion and truffle oil and avocado and tomato tartare served with salad and basil vinaigrette set the tone for a fine meal. Move on to try roasted lamb tian with cabbage fondant and beetroot puree or John Dory with vegetable tagliatelle and pea and ginger ravioli.

Take time to feel the explosion of flavour in dishes such as fillet of red mullet, pot of monkfish cheeks and saffron shellfish, thigh of rabbit melting in Espelette pepper and polenta with oil ceps. Desserts include short-crusted fig tart with rosemary syrup and violet ice cream and raspberry and fresh strawberries from Fèves with tonka and granita flowers.

So whether it's a bourse investor or a food lover seeking haute cuisine, Samuel and his team at Le Versance truly live up to the motto of this restaurant, which is based on the saying of the famous French politician and epicure, Brillat-Savarin. 'To invite someone in your home implies that you take his happiness into your own hands for the time he spends with you.'

French

N/A€60.00

Selected Restaurant

63 avenue Franklin-Roosevelt, Paris, 75008 [Map]

Trust the French to experiment with combining art forms to provide an experience the world has never seen before. Sixteen million computer generated colours generated by six hundred projectors on exotic wooden panels, with music as varied as blues and trance in the background with authentic French cuisine to enjoy, this is Restaurant Music Hall of Paris Champs Elysees. Learn more

Trust the French to experiment with combining art forms to provide an experience the world has never seen before. Sixteen million computer generated colours generated by six hundred projectors on exotic wooden panels, with music as varied as blues and trance in the background with authentic French cuisine to enjoy, this is Restaurant Music Hall of Paris Champs Elysees.

It's not known whether it was a chance meeting between Valério Berkovics, a show producer, who always dreamt about creating his ideal French restaurant, and Hervé Nepple, a young chef full of ideas, dreaming to explore without limits, that led to this experiential haven for gourmets, but nothing in the concept that was the outcome of the partnership has been left to chance.

An evening there is like a varied mood board with the lights creating the early morning feel to the glitter of the night as the DJs spin their magic on the turntable. In the lounge, garlands mark out the space to weave a more intimate atmosphere for a romantic diner or an exquisite meal.  Enjoy yourself with friends at the Piano bar listening to Ray Charles while sipping cocktails or grazing on light snacks in the early evening. 

If one were to go by the nature of the venue they could do well to perhaps break all the rules of fine dining and start with the dessert. After all, the restaurant is open all night and a three course could well follow a few drinks and handmade mangosteen ravioli served with a Suzette sauce in the wee hours.

When the ever-changing electronic ambience stokes your appetite leading you to signal one of the friendly energetic staff to bring the carte du jour to the table you'll find scallops and gambas 'en ceviché', marinated in lime or lemon juice with olive oil and spices, served hot and sautéed lobster with chanterelles and almonds, linguine and fine lobster bisque on it. Meat lovers may opt for thick slice of veal liver, covered with a balsamic sauce, served with crunchy potatoes or deer cutlets and foie gras, served with braised cabbage stewed apple.

You can try the tartar of veal and tuna accompanied by its delicious tuna cream and raw spiced fillet of beef with aromatic Thai green beans for starters. And then back to the desserts with a Foret d'Emeraude, strong mint cream spread on a bed of thin leaf of bitter chocolate laced with pancake. That'll complete the experience.

French

N/AN/A

Selected Restaurant

106 rue Saint-Honoré, Paris, 75001 [Map]

French actor Brice Fournier's passion for food, specifically Asian, is translated into the Livingstone, a restaurant focussing on Thai and Chinese cuisine, located on rue Saint Honoré. Culinary experimentation, as one can participate in there, is a favoured pastime of the Parisians, who, although preferring their own cooking, are not above embracing that of another country's so equably. Learn more

French actor Brice Fournier's passion for food, specifically Asian, is translated into the Livingstone, a restaurant focussing on Thai and Chinese cuisine, located on rue Saint Honoré. Culinary experimentation, as one can participate in there, is a favoured pastime of the Parisians, who, although preferring their own cooking, are not above embracing that of another country's so equably.

Deeply bolstering the style quotient of the Livingstone is the trendy and upscale décor by Veronique Lemaire, who favours a mix of African art seen through the 1930's Cubist vision. The effect is startlingly offbeat and eclectic without losing out on the warm and cosy touches that the seductively low lighting inspires.

A look at the menu shows that nostalgia evoking favourites such as tom yun gung, hot and sour soup with shrimp, mushrooms, lemon grass and chillies are present, while newer versions with refreshing flavours such as the hed tom kha, a delicate mushroom soup with coconut milk add to the versatility.

From the appetizers, you could try the ka nom jip, steamed shrimp dumpling or maybe the yum nua, beef salad with lemon grass and crushed rice. The ubiquitous satay, marinated and grilled chicken on a skewer with peanut sauce, makes its presence felt and well, it never fails to please.

The main course is spread over tantalising choices of seafood, beef, pork and poultry.  Sample the kari pneng, steamed salmon in red curry sauce or the kung yai pad kathieam, frog legs with garlic and green peppers, with colours and tastes that are typical of Thai food yet refreshingly different.

The massaman kari, lamb pieces in coconut milk with curry paste, tamarind juice and potatoes, draws influences from Indian coastal areas, while the kai bai toi, chicken wrapped in banana leaves, is wholly reminiscent of the far flung exotic East.

As befits the tropical landscape which inspired Livingstone, the desserts are fruit based with khao niaw mamuang, a concoction of sweet rice with mango or sapparod king, pineapple with sweet ginger that offers a unique treat to the taste buds. Ice cream and chocolate cake are also there if you prefer to end an unusual meal more traditionally.

There is a wide selection of coffee, tea, juices and cocktails while those looking for something stronger could opt for any of the wines, which are predominantly French, although there are some New World ones too.

American, Hamburgers, New York

€30.00€50.00

Featured Restaurant

25 Rue De La Pompe, Paris, 75016 [Map]

The words classy and chic seem synonymous with most top end restaurants in Paris but this one comes courtesy of the design maestro Philippe Starck himself. One visit to Restaurant Bon is probably insufficient to admire the four different and original settings created by Philippe and the stylish interior is worth the trip alone. Learn more

The words classy and chic seem synonymous with most top end restaurants in Paris but this one comes courtesy of the design maestro Philippe Starck himself. One visit to Restaurant Bon is probably insufficient to admire the four different and original settings created by Philippe and the stylish interior is worth the trip alone.

Elegant lamp shades and sleek furniture adorn The Vinotheque accentuated by strategic lighting, which add a warm glow to the place. The Fireplace Room with its ornate chandelier and glossy table tops create a unique sense of style and the little nook for private dining appears to be fiercely guarded by a rhino! Well, actually a rhino head. The Library needs no introduction and it's no surprise to see bookworms crawling their way through the numerous stacks, and then there's the Boudoir with exquisite tableware for large parties.

The menu's Asian touches are palpable and the cooking, which takes in influences from across the globe, is certainly enticing. Think coconut milk, crabmeat and green asparagus Wonton soup and dim sum of shrimp, basil and hot pepper, crabmeat and artichokes served with spinach and shiitakes, and five flavours duck. From among other delights that await look out for the spicy crab spring rolls with soya mayonnaise, new style tuna carpaccio, lobster rolls, and papaya and shrimp, and beef and lemongrass salad.

Fruits of the sea include sole prepared as a tempura with toffee and lemongrass sauce, grilled scallops with tom yum sauce, tuna tartar with ginger and gilthead breams in a banana leaf. For meatier main courses you are bound to be moved by the tiger's tears, a marinated filet of beef, grilled and thinly sliced, or perhaps the crispy sweet and sour chicken and five flavour spare ribs. If you thought an Asian inspired menu does not have too much to look forward to in the dessert section, then think again; there's rum baba with coconut and pineapple, fresh strawberries and raspberries with peppermint syrup, and spicy 'crème brûlée'.

Those who find solace at the lunch hour know full well that they need to refuel to take on the second half of the day, so how about some chicken and curry rolls, thinly sliced veal with ginger and shiitake and choco Bon. The wine list keeps the French flag flying high and there are notable contributions from Chile, Africa, China, Australia and California amongst others.

With its myriad dining options, Restaurant Bon certainly makes an ideal place to celebrate those special occasions.

International, Modern

N/A€20.00

L'Orenoc

81 Boulevard Gouvin Saint Cyr, Paris, 75017 [Map]

French

€42.00€65.00

More restaurants in Paris:

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Special Offers

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Week days, Lunch Menu Maréchal Ferrant, simple cuisine with a touch of originality at 23€.

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Test Essen November

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4 course fixed price menu (My Way) for €25.50

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Asian Christmas buffet, 28th Nov - 24th Dec

Selected Restaurant

Music Hall Restaurant

Paris

Trust the French to experiment with combining art forms to provide an experience the world has never seen before. Sixteen million computer generated colours generated by six hundred projectors ...