Suffolk Restaurants

218 restaurants in Suffolk





Restaurants in Suffolk:

Featured | Selected | Special Offers | Price | A-Z


Selected Restaurant

Bourne Hill, Wherstead, Ipswich, IP2 8ND [Map]

The Beefeater Grill range of restaurants, owned by the well established firm of Whitbread has transformed over time into what is now predominantly a cooking platform for chargrill. The restaurants are warm, modern and stylish, with low lighting and contemporary artwork. Learn more

The Beefeater Grill range of restaurants, owned by the well established firm of Whitbread has transformed over time into what is now predominantly a cooking platform for chargrill. The restaurants are warm, modern and stylish, with low lighting and contemporary artwork. A comfortable, cosy, mainly booth layout offers guests their own space with no feeling of being hurried at any point. Staff are friendly and helpful if need be - what a difference that can make to a good evening out.

Be it the wide open spaces of Argentina, the intimate setting of a French restaurant, or a busy grill in London's West End, there's no denying the popularity of chargrill. As the production of quality beef, chicken, fish and lamb has grown, prices have come down by comparison, and the simple and traditional art of minimally cooking dishes by chargrill, sealing in the flavours and tastes by intense heat has caught the public imagination.

All the steaks at Beefeater Grill are matured for a minimum of 28 days before being seasoned. Whether it be juicy rib eye, the classic sirloin, that emblem of the Sunday lunch, a tender fillet, or a delicious 7oz rump, all grilled to your own specification, you're never far away from perfection. Even beefburgers have shaken off their dubious image and the highly popular Beefeater burgers are made from 100% beef.

The popular sirloin with giant prawns offers a treat to those for whom an alliance between sea and pasture is a natural attraction, whilst a 16oz steak platter links rump, fillet, sirloin and rib eye into one mouth-watering dish served with chips, battered onion rings, grilled tomato, a flat mushroom and peppercorn and brandy sauce.

Many of us love rib meat, and the rack of ribs at a Beefeater Grill has a meaty rack smoky flavour; maple ribs of pork with a choice of three sauces, mojito, smoked caramel and apple glaze, or Bourbon and black BBQ. And if all else fails and you are totally baffled by the wealth of choices, ask to have a word with the Steakmaster who will help find what is right for you, together with the best cooking method. These guys leave nothing to chance.

On a menu that is a delight to read, let alone choose a meal from, expect to find smaller dishes such as traditional prawn cocktail, whitebait, chicken liver pâté and baked Camembert, or juicy lamb koftas served with yoghurt and mint dip. There's something about a good steak meal that always leaves a gap for a little temptation to sweeten up the scene and from amongst twelve options look for Belgian chocolate cheesecake, treacle sponge pudding or a caramel apple crumble pie.

Throughout the day a wide range of more general dishes are yours for the ordering, sandwiches, jackets, classic favourites like fish and chips, pasta, salads, and sharing dishes of nachos, potato shells and a Beefeater Grill combo. Next door to many of the restaurants are Premier Inns, so staying the night whatever the circumstances need not be a problem.

And what about wine? Endorsed by Matthew Jukes, wine writer in the Daily Mail and bon viveur in his own right, a wine list that marches with the menu completes an impressive and compelling invitation to enjoy whatever takes your fancy at the nearest Beefeater Grill.

Click on their Website for menu updates and special offers.

Grill, Pub

£11.00£25.00

Selected Restaurant

Fred Archer Way, Newmarket, CB8 7XN [Map]

Part of the Whitbread family, Table Table restaurants aim to bring great value tasty pub food to an ever increasing eating-out public who like well prepared and genuine food served by friendly staff in relaxing surroundings. Learn more

Part of the Whitbread family, Table Table restaurants aim to bring great value tasty pub food to an ever increasing eating-out public who like well prepared and genuine food served by friendly staff in relaxing surroundings. If that sounds too much like a dream come true be assured that at Table Table they also walk the talk, and are pleased to have the chance to prove it.

Their well located restaurants are spread across a wide range of decors and styles, and all of them share a determination to provide comfort, warmth and relaxation. Their buffet menus for special occasions are remarkable value.

In keeping with modern trends they provide dishes to nibble or share as guests consider the spread of options on a menu that could be described as British with welcome incursions. So as you share long Italian flatbread, and dough balls and dips, or a sharing platter with an imaginative range of finger food starting with garlic and breaded mushrooms, it's time to think about the relative merits of aromatic duck parcels, a prawn cocktail, breaded Camembert or sticky chicken goujons to name but a few.

Many an innocent dish from the past has been hi-jacked in the best possible sense into becoming what is now called a 'pub classic'. Wiltshire cure ham with eggs is served with chunky chips and beef, mushroom and ale pie, or chicken and chips are all familiar with British tables, be they in the dining room or the kitchen. Now they have been added to by chicken fajitas, a sweet red pepper, crème fraiche and fennel tart, a leg of duck slowly cooked and served with a Bramley apple and cider sauce, or chilli con carne with basmati rice, sour cream and guacamole and nachos. So is the humble burger with six enticing toppings.

The point is they, and others, are all here at Table Table, well prepared with quality ingredients, and presented in a way that makes you hungry even if you thought you weren't.

Getting down to the more serious side of the table keep an eye open for the seafood pie, a delightful assembly of things fishy including crayfish, red snapper, prawns and clams. Many of their steaks are 28 days matured, including a 7oz fillet. All steaks are served with watercress, roasted cherry tomatoes, a flat mushroom and chunky chips. A choice from 4 sauces adds the final touch of enjoyment.

Pastas and salads embrace some well known and loved names, but for sheer enjoyment the hot smoked salmon salad takes some beating - flakes of hot smoked salmon mixed with a house salad and soy and ginger sauce. A real winner.

Snacks aplenty cover hot baguettes with the like of grilled pork loin and Bramley apple sauce, sandwiches filled with Cheddar cheese, or prawns and Marie Rose sauce, and jacket potatoes with such temptations as chilli con carne. Add a bowl of chips for only a little extra.

A well travelled wine list offers helpful advice for the uninitiated and there's an impressive choice of draught and bottled beers and lagers. All in all it would appear that Table Table are more than achieving their aims, providing the opportunity for people to eat out enjoyably, with excellent value for money. Long may they continue to do so.

For completely up to date information on menu changes and special offers do make a regular check on their lively Website.

Family, Pub, Traditional

£13.00£20.00

Selected Restaurant

249 Yarmouth Road, Lowestoft, NR32 4AA [Map]

The Beefeater Grill range of restaurants, owned by the well established firm of Whitbread has transformed over time into what is now predominantly a cooking platform for chargrill. The restaurants are warm, modern and stylish, with low lighting and contemporary artwork. Learn more

The Beefeater Grill range of restaurants, owned by the well established firm of Whitbread has transformed over time into what is now predominantly a cooking platform for chargrill. The restaurants are warm, modern and stylish, with low lighting and contemporary artwork. A comfortable, cosy, mainly booth layout offers guests their own space with no feeling of being hurried at any point. Staff are friendly and helpful if need be - what a difference that can make to a good evening out.

Be it the wide open spaces of Argentina, the intimate setting of a French restaurant, or a busy grill in London's West End, there's no denying the popularity of chargrill. As the production of quality beef, chicken, fish and lamb has grown, prices have come down by comparison, and the simple and traditional art of minimally cooking dishes by chargrill, sealing in the flavours and tastes by intense heat has caught the public imagination.

All the steaks at Beefeater Grill are matured for a minimum of 28 days before being seasoned. Whether it be juicy rib eye, the classic sirloin, that emblem of the Sunday lunch, a tender fillet, or a delicious 7oz rump, all grilled to your own specification, you're never far away from perfection. Even beefburgers have shaken off their dubious image and the highly popular Beefeater burgers are made from 100% beef.

The popular sirloin with giant prawns offers a treat to those for whom an alliance between sea and pasture is a natural attraction, whilst a 16oz steak platter links rump, fillet, sirloin and rib eye into one mouth-watering dish served with chips, battered onion rings, grilled tomato, a flat mushroom and peppercorn and brandy sauce.

Many of us love rib meat, and the rack of ribs at a Beefeater Grill has a meaty rack smoky flavour; maple ribs of pork with a choice of three sauces, mojito, smoked caramel and apple glaze, or Bourbon and black BBQ. And if all else fails and you are totally baffled by the wealth of choices, ask to have a word with the Steakmaster who will help find what is right for you, together with the best cooking method. These guys leave nothing to chance.

On a menu that is a delight to read, let alone choose a meal from, expect to find smaller dishes such as traditional prawn cocktail, whitebait, chicken liver pâté and baked Camembert, or juicy lamb koftas served with yoghurt and mint dip. There's something about a good steak meal that always leaves a gap for a little temptation to sweeten up the scene and from amongst twelve options look for Belgian chocolate cheesecake, treacle sponge pudding or a caramel apple crumble pie.

Throughout the day a wide range of more general dishes are yours for the ordering, sandwiches, jackets, classic favourites like fish and chips, pasta, salads, and sharing dishes of nachos, potato shells and a Beefeater Grill combo. Next door to many of the restaurants are Premier Inns, so staying the night whatever the circumstances need not be a problem.

And what about wine? Endorsed by Matthew Jukes, wine writer in the Daily Mail and bon viveur in his own right, a wine list that marches with the menu completes an impressive and compelling invitation to enjoy whatever takes your fancy at the nearest Beefeater Grill.

Click on their Website for menu updates and special offers.

Grill, Pub

£11.00£25.00

Selected Restaurant

3 Augusta Close, Ipswich, IP3 9SS [Map]

Brewer's Fayre restaurants offer a warm welcome to those who want a reliably tasty meal in pleasant surroundings, with plenty of choice, minimal fuss and friendly service. With a reputation going back 25 years they should have a fair chance of doing that, but don't take our word for it. Learn more

Brewer's Fayre restaurants offer a warm welcome to those who want a reliably tasty meal in pleasant surroundings, with plenty of choice, minimal fuss and friendly service. With a reputation going back 25 years they should have a fair chance of doing that, but don't take our word for it. Give them a try and see if you agree that this is how good quality pub food should be served.

Whether it's snacks, grills, pub classics, fish, Sunday roasts or side dishes they think their way through the options, talk to their guests, and then come up with the goods. Not everybody wants a full meal so they've considered the needs of those who want to keep the gap filled and the children contented, perhaps on a journey or a day out.

Hot filled baguettes are always popular be it sausage and red onion or a classic chicken club sandwich. Jacket potatoes are good on their own but filled with mature cheddar cheese and beans they take on a new dimension.

More paced occasions demand a wide menu, perhaps with starters of breaded butterfly prawns, chicken goujons or breaded camembert bites. Grills are there for the hungry and whole rack of meaty BBQ pork ribs served with extra sauce, chips and coleslaw can be very welcome. The days of the mixed grill are back - or did they ever go away - a 4oz rump steak, two pork sausages, and a gammon steak topped with a fried egg served with all the trimmings will remind you if they did.

Salmon and prawn fishcakes are served with buttered new potatoes, tartare sauce and a lightly dressed salad. A combination of sea and land comes with a rump steak, whole grilled chicken breast and breaded breaded butterfly prawns, served with chips and a side salad or garden peas.

The rise of eating out in pubs has brought into our daily lives a whole legion of what might be termed 'pub classics'. Many of them have their roots in what used to be called 'good home cooking' and include such dishes as sausage, egg and chips, beef and ale pie, chicken and mushroom pie and for the very daring a beef lasagne. Well, all of them and many more are on the menu at Brewer's Fayre, supplemented by such new regulars as vegetable Goan chicken curry, pork chop, chilli con carne and grilled chicken and bacon salad.

It has often been said that chicken tikka masala is now the most popular dish in Britain. Some may not really want to believe that, much as they love curry, but travel, population movement and other factors have widened our scope and they are probably pretty keen on fish and chips in Timbuktu.

What is certain is that the great British Sunday roast is exclusive to these islands, though copied maybe elsewhere or in ex-pat outposts. No surprise therefore that it's on the Brewer's Fayre menu. A trade of three roasts with an opportunity to trade up to a mega roast for a modest sum. With it come two Yorkshire puddings, roast potatoes, fresh seasonal vegetables and that important element - gravy.

A fine list of immensely tempting desserts may well bring the most ardent weight-watcher to their knees. A short but well thought out wine list offers all choices, except champagne, by the glass. Staying the night - check to see if there's a Premier Inn next door - chances are you'll be lucky.

A quick click on their Website is always worth while. The only thing that stays still permanently is the quality which is helped by a changing menu, and some very special offers.

Pub, Traditional

£10.00£18.00

Selected Restaurant

The Street, Tuddenham, Newmarket, IP28 6SQ [Map]

Located in North West Suffolk, between Newmarket and Bury St Edmunds and not far from Cambridge, and serving quality, Modern British food, Tuddenham Mill, a converted 12th century flour mill has all the inbuilt charm and permanence that one might expect from its history and such a superb setting. Learn more

Located in North West Suffolk, between Newmarket and Bury St Edmunds and not far from Cambridge, and serving quality, Modern British food, Tuddenham Mill, a converted 12th century flour mill has all the inbuilt charm and permanence that one might expect from its history and such a superb setting. Much of the machinery remains intact and on view, and the mill pool provides a soothing view from the restaurant and a number of rooms.

With an array of culinary awards such as 3 AA Rosettes and an entry in the Good Food Guide, whilst their bedrooms were awarded four stars by the AA. The Coveted Editors' Award, one of the widely respected and sought after culinary title 'Up and Coming Chef of the Year' by the Good Food Guide 2012 has been awarded to the restaurant's Head Chef Paul Foster.

The clever combination of new and old is one of the principal charms of this restaurant with rooms and nowhere is this better demonstrated than in the bedrooms where old oak beams run riot, the floorboards are white, and the massive doubled-ended stone baths in some of the rooms are an object of extreme envy to those who do not have one in theirs. Walk in showers, fluffy bath sheets and Elemis toiletries provide further evidence of their dedication to excellence.

Choices between the three main Mill bedrooms, eight Mill Stream and Watermeadow rooms, and the Loft Rooms are by no means easy to make, but rest assured they all attain to the same high standard including Bose sound systems, Loewe flat screen TVs and Italian designed furniture, and those memorable 6ft beds with fully sprung mattresses.

You will find an enticing choice of dishes on the main Mill menu, with six starters that include corn-fed chicken wing with bone marrow, sultana purée and chicory; skate wings with avocado emulsion, bacon, lemon and raw peas, or roasted watermelon, goats' cheese, nettle juice with sea aster.

Denham Estate is brought to you on a plate when you order the fallow deer, red onion fondue, pearl barley, pear with Colston Bassett Stilton, or lamb rump and shoulder with butternut squash, smoked paprika, yoghurt and rock samphire. One of the best things about Britain is you are never too far from the sea and vastly improved facilities for keeping seafood fresh have changed our attitude to such shibboleths as never eating fish on Monday, so dishes such as river trout 40°C, shallot purée, broad and runner beans, kohlrabi, and brown butter, and salted hake with slow cooked cauliflower, confit potatoes, coconut and compressed gem juice are both popular and trusted.

In this haven of high eating it would be nothing short of a tragedy to miss out on the desserts, and bitter chocolate textures with chilled mugwort tea and semi-dried blueberries catch many an eye. The Suffolk strawberries with pine ice cream, granola and goats' milk provides a very unfair contest, but some will stick out for the cheese, not least because of its supporters, apple chutney, fruit and nut bread and Garibaldi biscuits.

Tuddenham Mill has set a new benchmark for excellence in the area. Click on their Website for further information about meetings and private functions.

Modern

£20.00£40.00

Featured Restaurant

30-31 Churchgate Street, Bury St Edmunds, IP33 1RG [Map]

Every so often you will read of the delights of small market town living, in such places say, as Bury St Edmunds where the pace drops a significant number of notches from, for example, the delights of Notting Hill. Learn more

Every so often you will read of the delights of small market town living, in such places say, as Bury St Edmunds where the pace drops a significant number of notches from, for example, the delights of Notting Hill. Some towns in Britain already enjoy the ready availability of good restaurants and one's mind thinks immediately of Ludlow in Shropshire, with more fine establishments per head of the population than probably anywhere else in Britain.

In Bury St Edmunds a French-style restaurant where the chef, Pascal Canevet, majors on fish, is perhaps part of a movement to encourage that ancient town in the same direction.
 
The menu is straightforward and the dishes offered, together with the roll call of wonderful piscine names. Let's start with the salmon, a plate of which is designed to tickle the tastebuds and will include salmon 'rillettes' with handpicked Cornish crab meat, cod and dill roulade and shellfish mayonnaise.

At the other end of the scale, and there are stopping-off places in between, is the Royal plate, a breathtaking presentation of lobster, crab, langoustines, oysters, whelks, tiger prawns and mussels.

Seared scallops is presented with diced vegetables brunoise, tomato and balsamic vinegar dressing, whilst fish soup served with rouille, garlic croutons and grated gruyère would need some serious avoiding action. Any quality fish menu is, almost of a necessity, going to mirror a changing market subject indeed to wind and tide, and Maison Bleue is no exception. It is this element of uncertainty that catches the interest and makes every visit a voyage of discovery.

On the other side, there are dishes that follow like wild turbot from the Scottish coast with pan-fried fillet, egg tagliatelle and garlic leaves sauce, or lemon sole, whole fish pan-fried with capers, croutons, lemon and parsley. It is surely one of the hallmarks of a successful approach to cooking fish that a minimalist approach in general pays off almost every time.

They offer different variations on lamb, fowl and beef and it is much to their credit that the wine list, which is full of fish-worthy whites, also does justice to the carnivores, though the tendency to drink red with anything, does seem to be on the increase.

The décor and front of house arrangements are faultless as one has come to expect with this modest but convincingly effective East Anglian group. If you are looking for further information, then you will find that a'plenty on their comprehensive Website, including menus. It should not come as a surprise to learn that it has been named as East of England's restaurant of the year 2009/2010 by the Good Food Guide and two Rosettes by the AA Guide.


French, Modern European, Seafood

£22.00£40.00

Featured Restaurant

Neptune Quay, Ipswich, IP4 1AX [Map]

Until comparatively recent times the word gunboat had colonial connotations that are fast fading into the dark shadows of Victorian imperialism. So with re-usage all the rage it may not come as a total surprise to find a superb relic of the maritime past, an imaginative and extremely well-presented floating survival, on the ancient waterfront of the historic port of Ipswich. Learn more

Until comparatively recent times the word gunboat had colonial connotations that are fast fading into the dark shadows of Victorian imperialism. So with re-usage all the rage it may not come as a total surprise to find a superb relic of the maritime past, an imaginative and extremely well-presented floating survival, on the ancient waterfront of the historic port of Ipswich.

Many of the original features of this fine and much travelled vessel, launched in 1899 in Belgium, are retained and so skilfully has the work been done that it is not always easy to disregard the feeling that you might emerge from the absorption of your meal, only to find yourself rocking gently off Dogger Bank or the German Bight.

Everything is immaculate and shipshape, the brasswork gleams, the woodwork reflects the subtle lights from the boat-studded harbour scene outside and the cries of the seabirds remove any possible lingering doubts of authenticity.

This seamanlike precision translates very easily it seems into the all-important area of the galley where French brasserie food, which by no means ignores fish, is prepared with consistent care, taking full advantage of the readily available local excellence evident in all three venues of this lively and well-respected East Anglian group.

The menu is as traditional as the ship's ropework and could include starters of spicy Thai haddock fish cake with sweet chili, coriander sauce and poached egg, a salad of crayfish baby tomato with pepper, boiled egg and olive oil vinaigrette or fresh crab meat layered with avocado mousse and tomato jelly.

A breath from the past is invoked by the grilled venison steak with rich cranberry and red wine sauce. To follow, perhaps the roasted fillet of sea bass with mashed potato and Hollandaise will do very well.

The sea air may well have induced an even keener appetite than usual, in which case consider yielding to the firepower of a grilled Aberdeen sirloin steak with Roquefort sauce and French fries. And talking of planks a gang-plank-walking selection of puddings offers good brasserie style such as cappuccino cheesecake with coffee coulis or the almond and honey pannacotta with red fruit jelly and white chocolate mousse. However, cheese-eaters of any nationality may find even armed resistance fails in the presence of an overwhelming force of well-kept cheeses.

An attractive selection of house wines come by the glass, carafe or bottle and the mainly French list can hardly fail to satisfy the needs of the most demanding raider. Tableware and service are in keeping with the best traditions of the wardroom mess, bringing the final touches to a voyage of nostalgic excellence. They do lunches of breathtaking value and quality and on the upper deck the wine bar offers opportunities for relaxation and light snacks.

Extremely full details on Mariners, including a pictorial tour and menus, are available on their Website.


French, Modern European

£20.00£36.00

Featured Restaurant
Book

Unit D, Cardinal Retail Park, Grafton Way, Ipswich, IP1 1AX [Map]

Housed within the busy Cardinal Retail Park, right opposite Cineworld Cinemas, Chimichanga Ipswich is the perfect retreat for an enjoyable Mexican meal after a tiring shopping expedition. With plenty of parking available, the restaurant is only a 4-minute drive from the Regent Theatre while Portman Road, the home of Ipswich Town Football Club, is even closer. Learn more

Housed within the busy Cardinal Retail Park, right opposite Cineworld Cinemas, Chimichanga Ipswich is the perfect retreat for an enjoyable Mexican meal after a tiring shopping expedition. With plenty of parking available, the restaurant is only a 4-minute drive from the Regent Theatre while Portman Road, the home of Ipswich Town Football Club, is even closer.

Chimichanga's extensive à la carte caters to a variety of palates. A wide range of delicious appetisers includes crab cakes, Buffalo chicken wings and empanadas, a traditional crispy pastry filled with a choice of chicken or chorizo sausage with cheese and served with sour cream. Other choices include piri piri prawns, Cajun chicken with chilli sauce and jalapeno bullets, a dish of deep fried jalapeno peppers with cream cheese and chilli sauce. Appetisers to share include chicken nachos or taquitos, crispy flour tortilla tubes with a range of fillings including cheese and black beans, chicken, cheese and salsa and chorizo and cheese.

Light bites include a range of tortilla wraps including a classic fajita wrap with a choice of char grilled fajita steak or chicken served with peppers and onions in a tortilla with Jack cheese. Vegetarians are catered for with the delicious courgette and Portobello mushroom wraps which comes with chipotle chilli sauce and jack cheese. There's also a number of tempting salad options such as blackened tuna salad with tuna steak coated in a special blend of Cajun spices, blacked on a hot skillet and served over a bed of mixed leaves with roasted peppers, cherry tomatoes and cucumber.

For something more filling diners could opt for a tortilla burger, made from 100 per cent fully traceable prime Scottish beef wrapped in a flour tortilla with mayonnaise and served with changa chips.

The char grill section's succulent offerings include barbecue baby back ribs served with change chips and jalapeno coleslaw; sirloin mojo rojo, a centre cut sirloin steak marinated in chilli, garlic and coriander and served with beer battered onion rings and change chips, Santa Fe chicken with rice, black beans and guacamole or flame grilled piri piri chicken.

Sumptuous Mexican specialities naturally include chimichanga, a flour tortilla fried golden brown with Jack cheese and served with your choice of filling - either chunky beef chilli con carne, BBQ pulled pork or bean chilli - sautéed onions and peppers and garnished with sour cream, chives, guacamole and tortilla croutons, as well as a variety of burritos, enchiladas and tostadas. There are also chipotle meatballs, Mexican paella, chilli de la casa and south-western crab cakes. The grande quesadilla is a baked flour tortilla sandwich with your choice of filling and drizzled with sour cream and served with Mexican rice and chipotle chilli sauce.

The lunch menu offers a choice of two or three courses while a children's menu caters to the tastes of the little ones.
Round off the satisfying meal with scrumptious dessert of giant Mexican profiterole, chocolate fudge brownie or honeycomb smash cheesecake. Alternatively, end with a speciality coffee or liqueur. Chimichanga offers a variety of wines, beers, cocktails, margheritas, sangria and soft drinks to quench the thirst.

More information can be found on their Website.

Mexican, Tex Mex

N/A£25.00

Featured Restaurant
Book

Orford Road, Bromeswell, nr Woodbridge, IP12 2PU [Map]

In an idyllic rural setting, opposite to the Woodbridge Golf Club, The British Larder is a wonderfully rustic gastropub offering a range of classic dishes prepared using the finest local ingredients. Learn more

In an idyllic rural setting, opposite to the Woodbridge Golf Club, The British Larder is a wonderfully rustic gastropub offering a range of classic dishes prepared using the finest local ingredients. The restaurant interior boasts an open fireplace, exposed brickwork, and a separate bar, while the al fresco dining area is perfect for families and couples to enjoy the sunshine and a pint of beer.

Traditional touches carry over to the cooking, which reflect the best of Suffolk's produce, and the menus change regularly allowing room for fresh, seasonal dishes. The lunch menu includes the fascinating 'Orford Smokehouse Experience' a deli platter with smoked prawns, smoked salmon with capers and lemon and Butley oyster with shallot and thyme vinaigrette. Other dishes include a classic Suffolk farmhouse ploughman's lunch and hearty main courses of steak and kidney pot pie with seasonal greens or a homemade venison burger. Alternatively you could choose from a range of freshly made sandwiches.

The evening menu displays the same commitment to fresh, seasonal produce and could include starters of East Coast wild sea bass carpaccio with fennel, lime and coriander salad, and Bromeswell wild rabbit terrine with damson chutney and toasted Pump Street sourdough. High quality local ingredients are evident in main courses of slow-cooked Dingley Dell pork belly with crushed celeriac and honey roasted village carrots, and a lavish Orford-Ness lobster and Loch Duart salmon macaroni.

Desserts don't stray too far from the local realm and choices include High House Farm Victoria plum, lavender and almond tart with plum sorbet, and damson parfait with olive oil and thyme sable, sourced from British Larder's back garden. The extensive wine list arrives with useful notes and features an impressive selection from around the world, alongside spirits, liqueurs, beers and ciders.

Sunday lunch at the British Larder is a relaxed affair with two and three course menus offering a pot of Pinney's of Orford smoked prawns with creamy garlic sauce and garden lovage salad, oven-roasted Sutton Hoo chicken rubbed in kitchen garden garlic herb butter and sticky toffee pudding with toffee sauce and Suffolk Meadow vanilla ice cream.

Open seven days a week, the British Larder serves a selection of cakes and light dishes at the bar right through the day. They also cater for special events with customised menus and the venue is available for private hire.

To gain further information, just visit their extremely comprehensive Website.

British

£25.00£38.00

Featured Restaurant

Market Place, Lavenham, CO10 9QZ [Map]

Lavenham has to be high on the list of most attractive villages in England, the sort of place where people who may be weary of their everyday locations come for some well-earned rejuvenation. It is no surprise therefore that the Great House Restaurant at Lavenham should fit in so well to this idyllic background. Learn more

Lavenham has to be high on the list of most attractive villages in England, the sort of place where people who may be weary of their everyday locations come for some well-earned rejuvenation. It is no surprise therefore that the Great House Restaurant at Lavenham should fit in so well to this idyllic background.

One of the highlights of Suffolk for nearly 30 years with chef/owner Régis Crépy, do expect 'a seriously good cuisine, but far from solemn'.

Rated as one of 'Britain's top 100 Restaurants' by the Sunday Times and top scorer in Harden's Guide, The Great House is sophisticatedly dressed in white with crisp linen tablecloths and sparkling glass; The clean-lined modernity has been softened with the exposed beams and open brick fireplace making it as cosy as it is stylish. The service is with a smile; knowledgeable and friendly, the all team effortlessly ensure that customers thoroughly enjoy their meal.

There are several menus, of which the à la carte is but one example, and whilst the overall influence is French, ingredients tend to follow regional sourcing with an emphasis on freshness.

Described by The Mail on Sunday as 'a gem of a small country hotel-restaurant with an authentic taste of France', The Great House has five luxurious accommodations, with no expense spared to ensure the sort of setting where, as you walk into your room you know instinctively that this is your personal paradise, yours for as long as you can stay.

Starters could include duck foie gras, French 'les landes' foie gras ballotine marinated with Armagnac and Port and grilled brioche, or tuna and mackerel sushi, marinated red tuna with olive oil, lemon juice, sesame seeds and rice vinegar mackerel fillet.

First courses of this kind of integrity create the sort of confidence that enables a meal to be enjoyed to the full and main courses of roasted duck breast with wild morel mushroom sauce, or farmed halibut, grilled with spinach and coriander salsa, white wine and passion fruit sauce, do nothing to diminish this sense of well-being. Dinner brings perhaps a shrimp cocktail with cucumber, coriander, fresh chilli horseradish cream and tomato sorbet followed by cheek of beef slowly cooked in red wine Le Puy lentils and bacon.

It is within the dessert menu at The Great House that opportunities exist for the most outrageous indulgence. Who, in their right gastronomic mind, would be able to keep calm as they dallied between the relative merits of a dark and milk chocolate ganache with runny salted caramel heart and crispy 'Tuile' biscuit just so, or a crème brûlée, pistachio and raspberry with crispy top? Well, there are those who would head unerringly for the wonderful selection of perfectly kept French cheeses.

It would be strange if the wine list was anything but equal to the task of matching the cuisine, and not only is the selection everything you would expect and by no means confined to France alone, it is also amazingly good value for money. There is a magnificent range of half bottles, excellent house wine and champagne by the glass, with ports, cognacs, armagnacs and liqueurs enough to ensure a very happy landing.

If I display inclinations towards what some might see as a rave review, it is simply because a lot of people get parts of it right part of the time - few achieve the full monty. Be assured that The Great House at Lavenham is most definitely one of them. Perhaps it should not come as a surprise therefore that the Good Food Guide made them East of England Restaurant of the Year 2009, whilst the Good Hotel Guide for 2009 made them Restaurant with Rooms of the Year. They have also been awarded two Rosettes by the AA Guide.

Their Website informs well about the hotel and restaurant and has a number of useful links to enhance your enjoyment on a wider scale.

French, Gourmet, Modern European

£27.00£40.00

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